5 steps to making annual enrollment the most wonderful time of the year

(BPT) – It’s that time of year again. But before you plan your Thanksgiving menu or check off your gift list, it’s time to think about employee benefits.

VSP Vision Care surveyed employees about their attitudes around that special time of year when they must choose a benefits package and found that annual open enrollment is less popular than even tax season. While selecting your benefits may not exactly be a party, there’s no need for dread. They’re called benefits for a reason.

In spite of how important employer-sponsored benefits are, The 2015 Ninth Study of Employee Benefits: Today and Beyond from Prudential shows that people spend very little time considering their benefits. In fact, 32 percent spent just one to two hours on this important topic and 23 percent spent less than 30 minutes.

“The decisions we make during open enrollment can have an impact throughout the next year,” said James Gemus, senior vice president, head of product and business segments, group insurance for Prudential Financial. “These decisions deserve careful consideration and people owe it to themselves to consider every possible option. The research shows us that 55 percent of the time spent on benefit decisions was devoted to medical coverage. That’s certainly understandable, but they should be careful not to overlook other key benefits offered through their employer, like disability or life insurance.”

Make the most of this season’s open enrollment with these tips from Prudential:

1. Review all of your options. Employers and employees often look at medical, dental and vision as taking priority, and with good reason. However, don’t overlook other benefits, such as life and disability insurance, critical illness and accident insurance, which can complement these core offerings and are key to overall financial wellness. Seventy-one percent of Americans live paycheck to paycheck, according to the study Getting Paid in America. Disability insurance can help protect a portion of your income if you become too sick or injured to work and earn a paycheck. That’s important because 62 percent of bankruptcies are based on a medical event and 78 percent of those who experience medical bankruptcies had health insurance. Critical illness insurance can help reduce the amount of out-of-pocket costs associated with certain serious medical issues. Insurance is a great way to help protect yourself financially from unexpected risks, so explore all of your options.

2. Take advantage of cost and convenience. Purchasing benefits like life or disability insurance through your employer can simplify things for you in two ways: First, you often pay less for them than had you purchased them on your own because you’re taking advantage of group rates; and second, you pay for these benefits through payroll deduction, which is not only simple, but also reduces your gross income, which may help lower your taxes.

3. Make the most of financial wellness programs: In a recent Prudential survey only 22 percent of individuals described themselves as feeling financially secure. Sixty-three percent said that employee satisfaction with benefits is important for their company’s success and employees are increasingly looking to those benefit offerings as a basis for financial security. So as more workers rely on their workplace as a primary source of insurance and savings — 35 percent of workers as of 2015 up from 30 percent in 2013 — employers are trying to ensure that every employee gets the most from the benefits they have. As an employee, don’t forgo this opportunity, ask questions both of your company and your coworkers to learn more about all of your options. It’s your benefits package but it only benefits you if you use it.

4. Look for tools to help make decisions. Often, employers will provide websites where you can not only enroll, but also offer tools like calculators and videos that can help you make sense of your benefits. This means getting the help you need in understanding your financial protection needs and selecting the best options to meet them. So take the time to explore them. It’s time well spent.

5. Ask for help. With all the options out there, it’s easy to feel confused. Speak with your employer’s benefits experts or HR resources. You can also speak to a financial professional and learn more about how to select the coverage that will fit your needs. You may be amazed at the good information that’s available.

The Prudential Insurance Company of America Newark, NJ

0311212-00001-00

Read more

Paving the way to college: 4 things parents need to know

(BPT) – Senior year: It’s a time to finish college applications, solidify friendships and look forward to the freedom and the responsibility that come once that final bell rings. A lot of feelings surface during that final year, especially for parents. While your son or daughter might be overjoyed to finally fly the coop and live independently, you’ll probably be dealing with your own mix of emotions, and you’ll want to be sure they’re ready to begin college in the fall.

For families with a child headed to college, senior year is best thought of as a transition year. Plan ahead to make sure your family stays on track.

To help you and your child with a successful transition, here’s the essential list of landmarks on the road that will take your child from a senior in high school to a freshman in college.

1. Apply yourself in the fall

The journey to college begins early, and by the fall of senior year in high school, your child should be in full transition mode. They should be finishing campus visits and finalizing the list of colleges where they want to apply. Make sure they’ve spoken with admission counselors, thoroughly researched schools they’re interested in and have everything they need to complete their college applications.

Keep tabs on important deadlines and stay organized to avoid missing any critical due dates. For example, will they want to apply early decision or early action? If so, make sure you have weighed how this could impact your financial plan for college.

2. Focus on financial aid from the start

For many parents, one of the biggest anxieties around college is the cost. Don’t forget that the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) opens on Oct. 1, and some aid is awarded on a first-come, first-served basis. Make sure you submit the form as soon as it’s available.

Because everyone has different needs, figuring out how to finance your child’s education requires some research.

At College Ave Student Loans, you can find private loan options for parents and students. Even if you’re not ready to take a loan out yet, parents and students can try out the fast and easy pre-qualification tools to find out if their credit pre-qualifies for a loan, and what interest rates they could expect, all without impacting their credit scores. Calculators are also available to help you explore your options and see how you can customize the loan payments to fit your budget.

3. Spring time is decision time

Early in the spring, your child will start to receive their first acceptance letters. Once they’ve heard from all of the schools where they applied, they’ll have a big decision to make.

They need to do more than just decide which school to attend; they’ll also need to send in a deposit, complete their housing form and accept financial aid packages.

A crucial step in this process is comparing award letters from the colleges where your child has been accepted. In reading these letters, pay close attention to how schools list the total costs. For instance, some schools will subtract the awarded loan amount from the total cost of attendance, while others will not. This could make the net cost of some schools appear less than others when in reality they are not, so take your time reading the documents.

4. Tie up everything in the summer

Before they head to campus, you and your children should create a budget to keep tabs on college bills. This will help you to stay on track financially and set the right expectations about how they need to manage their money.

You can help your soon-to-be freshman by working with them to outline a monthly budget that will take into account expected and unexpected expenses. Take a look at their financial aid packages and any income they might be earning and block out the monthly mandatory expenses. Then decide how much money they can spend on things like entertainment.

If you find that scholarships, grants and federal aid don’t cover everything, private loans could be one solution for some college-bound students.

For parents and students, senior year is an exciting period. Knowing what steps to take and staying ahead of financial matters with useful tools like the ones at College Ave Student Loans can help make the transition easier for everyone.

Read more

Don’t be misled by these down payment myths

(BPT) – Confused about how much you need for a down payment on a house? You’re not alone.

Whether it’s your first time buying a home or you’ve been around the block, calculating the right amount for a down payment can be a challenge. Many admit that accumulating down payment funds is one of the more daunting parts of the homebuying process. However, the down payment hurdle is not always based on financial reality, but rather on a longstanding myth — that 20 percent of a home’s purchase price is required. In fact, almost half (45 percent) of first-time buyers thought they needed 20 percent or more for a down payment, according to Bank of America’s 2017 Homebuyer Insights Report.

While putting 20 percent down was an established rule of thumb for previous generations, people are rethinking the former one-size-fits-all approach to homeownership.

So, what’s the magic number?

Is it 3 percent? 5 percent? 10 percent? 30 percent? With so much uncertainty about down payment requirements, it’s no wonder people have trouble determining when and if they can buy a home. The truth is, however, that the magic number varies from one homebuyer to the next. According to the National Association of REALTORS, buyers put an average of just 6 percent down when buying a home, far below common perceptions. With this truth in mind, prospective buyers can access tips and tools that will help them create a plan that’s customizable to their financial situation, helping them feel confident in their decision to buy.

Whether you’re financially stable or could use a little assistance, don’t feel trapped by the 20 percent down payment — it’s a myth after all.

Knowledge is (buying) power

With U.S. homeownership near a 50-year record low, according to Rosen Consulting Group, it’s important that potential buyers understand the affordable housing options available to them so they have the opportunity to pursue their dreams of homeownership.

Down payments don’t need to be intimidating. There are affordable entry points to homeownership for creditworthy buyers, many of which require down payments as low as 3 percent. Prospective homeowners can explore ways to lower upfront figures by searching for down payment and cost-saving programs, using tools like Bank of America’s Down Payment Resource Center. This database has more than 1,000 local and national assistance programs and is a way to navigate and research many of the existing options in the buying space.

Purchasing power correlates with responsibility and accountability. With that said, if buyers put in the time to research and educate themselves on affordable-housing solutions, they will discover that homeownership may be closer in reach than they thought.

Be realistic, not idealistic, about buying a home

While you want to confirm that you are in a financial position to comfortably make monthly mortgage payments and properly maintain a home, you don’t have to have a perfect financial situation. Before you begin house hunting, there are things you can look into to get prepared. Checking your credit score will give you a better understanding of how you’ll be viewed as a potential borrower. While having a healthy credit score is ideal, there are options for applicants with limited or nontraditional credit histories. For instance, Bank of America’s Affordable Loan Solution mortgage accepts nontraditional forms of credit history, meaning buyers can show financial accountability in the form of monthly rent payments and utility bills. This low down payment program allows buyers to put down as little as 3 percent, and there is no mortgage insurance requirement.

Beyond formalized down payment assistance programs, many first-time buyers today get help from family in the form of gifts or assistance from employers. It’s also common to ask the seller of a home to contribute toward closing costs, which can help reduce out-of-pocket costs to close a loan.

Educational resources that support and inform the modern homebuying process allow buyers to feel confident in choosing an affordable solution that makes buying more accessible. Homeownership remains the best way for families to build wealth and stability over the long term, and busting common down payment myths helps people overcome the obstacles that stand between them and their dream of homeownership.

Read more

All home warranties are not created equal

(BPT) –

Having a home warranty is a smart way to help deal with the inevitable home repair problems that all property owners face at one point or another.

After all, a good home warranty can mean getting expert help when your HVAC system needs to be fixed, your water heater needs to be replaced, or your refrigerator requires a new part.

But unfortunately, all home warranties are not created equal. And shopping for a home warranty can be tough, especially if you aren’t familiar with home warranty coverage and providers.

So to find a home warranty that will protect your home and budget, here are three important questions to ask, along with a few tips on what to look for in a top-notch home warranty.

1. What’s covered?

Some home warranties are only good for appliances. Others focus on systems within your house, such as your air conditioning, heating or plumbing systems. The best warranties offer broad protection at a fair price, and even allow you to select from various coverage approaches based on your needs.

When shopping around, inquire about exclusions, limitations and non-covered expenses. Most, if not all, plans DO have these. For example, there may be a cap on the amount of coverage for a particular item; an environmental disposal fee, required in some counties, may be excluded from coverage; or modifications, not covered under the home warranty, may be needed to bring a covered system up to code or in compliance with new standards.

2. Is the price affordable?

Obviously, you’ll want to initially know the specifics of how much a warranty will cost you — not just for the annual price of coverage, but also for future service calls.

When purchasing an American Home Shield warranty, you choose a $75, $100 or $125 fee for your service requests, which gives you the flexibility to pay more or less for your annual contract. As with all home warranty companies, the price of an American Home Shield warranty plan varies based on multiple factors, including the specific type of plan you choose and your state of residency. But basic coverage starts at about $300 and goes up to around $600 annually for more comprehensive plans — a bargain considering the cost of replacing things in your house that will likely break down at some point.

When considering cost factors, also ask if all the items you want covered are included in the base cost of the plan, or whether you will need to add additional items to create the perfect plan for your home.

3. Does the home warranty cover just mechanical components?

Before you buy any home warranty, inquire about the extent of coverage different companies may provide based on normal wear and tear of an item — as well as any limitations.

Many components of home systems and appliances contain both mechanical and non-mechanical features. While the primary goal of a home warranty is to repair or replace covered items so that they function mechanically, American Home Shield covers both mechanical repairs and certain non-mechanical items, such as handles, doors, knobs and shelves.

That doesn’t mean everything is covered, of course. So let’s say your child stands on your dishwasher door and breaks the seal. Sorry, but that is NOT a covered repair, because it is not “normal” wear and tear.

Also, what happens if a repair person comes to your home and, despite his or her best efforts, simply can’t fix something covered under your home warranty?

With an AHS home warranty, if a repair person can’t fix a covered item, AHS will replace it.

That doesn’t mean you will necessarily get the precise brand and color of, say, a washing machine or dryer. After all, you may have bought your laundry set four years ago, and the manufacturer might not even make those exact same models or colors today.

However, if your washer and dryer do fizzle out completely, AHS will install a replacement that has similar operational features.

What’s more, at American Home Shield, 98 percent of service requests are dispatched to local repair technicians within 24 hours.

Using your home warranty wisely

Regardless of the type of home warranty you buy or whom you buy it from, always follow the maintenance guidelines specified for your home’s appliances and systems. Likewise, it’s a smart idea to have those systems and appliances regularly serviced.

Taking both of those steps can prevent many service repair calls and help reduce your overall cost of homeownership.

Ultimately, an excellent home warranty provides you with a solid asset that helps safeguard one of your biggest investments.

Read more

How to save on healthcare costs in 2018

(BPT) – (BPT) – Your cable bill, entertainment expenses, grocery extras — these often top the list when people sit down to discuss where they can save money.

One expense you should consider in 2018 is your healthcare costs. Since autumn marks the beginning of the annual open enrollment period for employees, now is the ideal time to sign up for a new health benefit plan or make adjustments to your current plan.

Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) and Flexible Spending Accounts (FSAs) are two options for people looking to save money pre-tax in the New Year. An FSA, which is provided by your employer, allows you to save funds for eligible healthcare expenses. An HSA — which you can obtain on your own or through your employer — is a tax-advantaged savings account that allows you to set aside money to cover medical expenses throughout your lifetime.

Both accounts have the major advantage that the full amount of your pre-tax dollars may be used toward care that you or your family may need. Employees who enroll in an FSA can contribute a portion of their salary pre-tax to pay for qualified medical care expenses within the plan year, while an HSA provides people with qualifying high-deductible health plans the ability to rollover balances and pay for current and future medical expenses.

Awareness and interest in HSAs has increased this year, with the highest levels of interest stemming from Millennials and Gen Xers, according to the 2017 Flexible Spending Account and Health Savings Account Consumer Research study commissioned by Visa and conducted by C+R Research. This nationwide online research was conducted in March 2017, with the FSA survey conducted among 1,306 consumers and the HSA survey conducted among 1,090 consumers.

Key features of HSAs that are most appealing to consumers include the ability to roll over unused dollars from year to year, pre-tax contributions, and having money available to pay for healthcare services.

The study indicates that 91 percent of FSA users agree that saving money, since contributions are pre-tax, tops their list of reasons for having an FSA. Sixty-four percent of FSA users believe that FSAs help them be more prepared and plan for healthcare expenses. In fact, 22 percent of their healthcare purchases (most notably routine doctor visits and vision expenses) on average would not be made if they didn’t have an FSA.

One of the most convenient ways to access funds in an HSA or FSA is with a Visa Healthcare Card, which allows people to use funds in their HSA or FSA to pay for qualified medical expenses wherever Visa debit cards are accepted, making it easy to pay for expenses such as:

*Co-pays and deductibles

*Prescriptions

*Dental services: Cleanings, orthodontia, dentures

*Physical exams

*Vision care, including exams, new glasses, laser eye surgery

*Hearing exams and aids

*Medical equipment such as blood pressure monitors, thermometers

*Smoking cessation programs

For added convenience, many pharmacies, grocery stores and other retailers that sell healthcare products have the capability to distinguish between covered items and non-covered items when you pay for them, so you don’t have to wonder whether something is covered.

By using a Visa Healthcare Card at these locations, you no longer have to pay out-of-pocket and then submit receipts to be reimbursed for your medical expenses, saving you time and money!

These are all great reasons why 80 percent of FSA users surveyed prefer to access their funds with their FSA card over other methods, and why 76 percent of HSA users surveyed say a debit card linked to an HSA makes paying for medical expenses convenient. As you review your options this open enrollment season, ask your employer if it offers an HSA or FSA with a Visa Healthcare Card to provide easy access to your funds. To learn more, visit www.visahealthcare.com.

Read more

5 simple ways to stay connected as a family on a budget

(BPT) – School’s out, summer’s here and the family is ready for some fun-in-the-sun memory making! It’s the perfect time to bond, catch up and enjoy the slower pace of the season. However, with fun on the brain, it’s easy to find yourself dipping into pockets a bit more for ice cream treats and new toys. To help keep summer full of fun but low on cost, here are five simple tips to ensure an unforgettable summer that won’t break the bank:

1. Staycation

When summer rolls around, the coast often calls. However, sun, surf and relaxation don’t come cheap if that also includes plane tickets, hotel expenses and all the other unexpected costs of traveling. The lakes and rivers of the U.S. make great alternatives to the far-away oceans, and for most, there are options just a short drive away. Pack the family and a cooler filled with your favorite refreshments and snacks, crank up the tunes and make an afternoon at the lake a cost-friendly summer getaway the whole family will love.

2. Family fun at home

With the kids home from school, the summer brings lots of opportunities for fun family time. A trip to the amusement park or movie theater is a tempting way to get out of the house, but those options turn expensive quickly. Instead, try finding ways to have fun together at home! Plan game and movie nights, camp in the backyard or organize a picnic with neighbors. You can have fun and bond as a family without breaking the bank.

3. New mobile plan

For busy families, staying in touch at an affordable cost is essential. Whether you need more data, have a set budget or simply need reliable coverage, a new family mobile plan could be the solution to your family’s wireless needs. Try Walmart Family Mobile, which now offers better coverage on T-Mobile’s nationwide 4G LTE network. Getting started is easy — with no contracts, no activation fees and a discount for every new family member added to your account. You can pick from one of four unlimited plans, starting at just $24.88 per month, and great deals on new phones. Walmart Family Mobile will also be offering an upgraded plan, offering you TRULY Unlimited Data* for $49.88. You can even keep your own phone and switch — it’s that easy. Check out the great new deals at MyFamilyMobile.com.

4. Plan meals

Family dinners are a great way to reminisce on the day’s fun, but it can be hard to find the energy to cook a homemade meal after all that fun or a long day at work. Ordering pizza might be a tempting way to feed the family, but the costs of eating out adds up quickly. To prevent last–minute and last-resort fast food dinners, try making a weekly meal plan in advance. Ask the kids to get involved with suggestions; they’ll enjoy getting the chance to contribute to a task typically left for adults, and if they are old enough, they can even have assigned days of the week to make simple meals for the family themselves. If not, they are never too young to do the dishes! Choose recipes that create generous leftovers and either freeze for future meals or pack for lunches the next day.

5. Break out the grill

Enjoy the thrill of the grill when making those homemade meals and turn dinnertime into a way to enjoy cool summer nights while cutting costs. Not only fun and seasonal, by grilling outdoors you can decrease your energy consumption — no need for the oven or A/C al fresco — and save you money.

Enjoying time with the family shouldn’t mean worrying about your wallet. By incorporating the tips above, you and your family can cut costs and stay connected while having a blast this summer.

† To get 4G LTE speed where available you must have a 4G LTE capable device and a 4G LTE SIM card. Actual availability, coverage and speed may vary. During periods of congestion, Walmart Family Mobile customers may notice reduced speeds versus carrier branded customers. LTE is a trademark of ETSI. LTE is a trademark of ETSI.

* Does not include tethering. Video typically plays at DVD quality. During congestion, top 3% of users (>32GB/mo.) may notice reduced speeds due to deprioritization.

Please always refer to the latest Terms and Conditions of Service at MyFamilyMobile.com.

Read more

Crunching dollars and planning weddings: How to financially plan for the big day

(BPT) – Attending most weddings, with the exception of your creepy uncle’s third marriage, is great. You eat free food, get to dance to music and leave without having to take part in the cleanup or the costs.

It gets a little different when you’re the one footing the bill. Then you’re confronted with 127 different invitation styles, a guest list that keeps growing and awkward phone calls to cousins to tell them they can’t bring their bratty 7-year old twins.

Falling in love might have been easy and making the decision to spend the rest of your life together was probably a no-brainer. However, celebrating your love and funneling all that joy into one beautiful ceremony and one memorable party is where things get a little more complicated.

As a leader in creating credit scoring models and educating consumers on credit, VantageScore Solutions shares how important it is for couples to agree on how to manage their finances.

So let’s get into it and look at some of the financial topics you and your partner should go over.

Paying for your wedding

No doubt how to pay for your dream wedding will be one of the first conversations you’ll have with your loved one. Some people have months, sometimes even more than a year to plan and save up for the big day. Other times you may need to make a deposit or pay for something upfront and you might not have the cash to do it.

This is when you reach for your credit card.

Even if you don’t plan to use a credit card, it’s more than likely you’ll have to put some things on credit. This might include just about anything you purchase online, from the cute decorations you find on Etsy or novelty gifts you find on Amazon. In addition, many venues require you to have a credit card on file.

The point is, it’s likely that at some point you’ll use credit to pay for your wedding. When you do this, both you and your partner need to be aware of the potential perils of racking up debt. Provided you can responsibly manage the debt and have a plan to do so, your credit score won’t decline, which can lead to more purchasing opportunities in the future.

But first, you need to talk about credit with your partner.

The talk

Talking about credit might not exactly be a champagne and strawberries moment, but it is probably one of the most important discussions you can have.

Because it might be hard to get started on this topic, many couples find it’s easier to start by taking The Credit Score Quiz. This 12-question quiz is easy to take and can do a lot to reveal the knowledge gaps you and your partner may need to fill.

While the quiz is a great way to get started, resources like The Score, a monthly newsletter from VantageScore Solutions that covers all things credit, can help you continue on your conversation and guide you on your journey.

So while you’re debating what shade of off-white is right for your invitations, take the time to talk and use these credit-related resources. After the big day has come and gone, you’ll be glad that together, both of you were smart about your finances.

Read more

How the state you live in affects your college savings strategy

(BPT) – The cost of a four-year college degree now hovers around the $100,000 mark, according to data from the National Center for Education Statistics. While high college costs seem universal these days, college savings strategies are far from a one-size-fits-all. Many factors influence how you’ll save for college, including your children’s ages when you start saving, what schools they might want to attend, and how old you’ll be when they enter college.

The factor most people don’t know about, however, is that the state you live in actually can dramatically affect how you save for education.

“Because states offer different incentives for college savings, the state you live in can play a large role in how you prioritize different savings opportunities,” says Nick Holeman, a certified financial planner with independent online financial adviser Betterment. “Tools like 529 savings plans, state tax credits and matching savings programs vary by state, creating a checkerboard of different savings opportunities.”

Why states affect college savings: 529 plans

The central reason why states have such an impact on college savings strategy is because of a special college savings account, created by the Internal Revenue Code, called a 529 plan.

States administer the plans, and so, different states can choose to offer different incentives for improving their residents’ college savings. In general, there are two types of 529 plans: pre-paid tuition plans and savings programs.

Pre-paid tuition plans allow you to pay for your child’s tuition, in advance, years before he or she will go to college. This allows you to pay current tuition prices, rather than the going rate when your child attends school in the future — when costs could be even higher. Compare that to savings plans that allow you to put money away for college, invest it so your money can grow, and forgo paying federal income tax on the earnings from your investment when you withdraw money to pay for college.

In general, 529 accounts are a great option for college savings because of their tax advantages. However, those tax savings also come with restrictions. Depending on where you live and your personal preferences, you may find these restrictions don’t outweigh the benefit of your state’s 529 plan.

Important questions to ask when building a college savings strategy

Because 529 plan incentives play such a big role in developing a college savings strategy, Holeman points to five key questions that savers should answer about their state before opening any accounts.

1. Does the state offer a match program?

According to SavingforCollege.com, 10 states currently have programs that provide matching dollars for contributions made to 529 savings plans held by low- and middle-income families. These programs may match contributions dollar-for-dollar up to a certain amount (as in Kansas) or have a tiered structure that increases the match for families with lower incomes (as in Arkansas). Other states allow employers to offer 529 matching dollars as a benefit to their employees. However, 529 match programs are only available for in-state account-holders, so if you have a 529 from Arkansas, but live in Ohio, you won’t be eligible for Arkansas’ program. If you’re eligible for a 529 match, you should consider contributing at least enough to max out that match.

2. What types of 529s does the state offer?

In addition to pre-paid tuition and savings accounts, a third type of 529, called 529 ABLE, helps people with disabilities save for college and other expenses without affecting other government benefits they might receive. Further, each of those three types of 529s can have structural differences from state to state. Some states may offer all types of plans, while others may offer only one or two. If your state doesn’t offer the type of 529 you’re looking for, you can opt for another state’s 529. Be aware though that you will likely miss out on any state tax benefits if you go with an out-of-state 529 plan.

3. What is the maximum account balance permitted?

While 529s can be a great way to save money for college, they do have limits. Every state sets a maximum account balance, and if your 529 reaches that limit, whether through contributions, investment growth or both, you won’t be allowed to make any more contributions to it. Limits vary from state to state. For example, Pennsylvania’s 529 max is $511,758, while Mississippi’s is less than half that. If you’re planning on saving for a private college or graduate school, these limits can become a factor.

4. Does the state offer a tax deduction for its 529s?

Some states offer full or partial tax deductions for 529 contributions, while others don’t. Most states only offer the tax deduction if you choose your state’s 529 plan. If you do get a tax deduction, it likely makes sense to stick with your state’s 529. If not, the tax benefits are much less.

5. What is the quality and quantity of schools in the state?

While most 529 funds can be used anywhere, there can be additional benefits to using 529 funds in the account’s home state. Before you commit to a 529 savings plan from any state, explore the availability of higher education in that state. For example, Texas has great public schools, so their pre-paid tuition program might make sense. For other states, the savings plan can make more sense though.

The key takeaway is that the state you live in can affect how beneficial a 529 plan is for you. Some people may even decide a 529 is not worth the added restrictions and instead opt to save for college in a standard taxable account.

To learn more about 529s and how they can help you save for college, visit www.savingforcollege.com. The most effective college savings strategies are part of a personalized financial plan. Learn more about setting goals to help maximize your savings at Betterment.com/financial-planning.

Read more